Aboriginal Communities

“CHEAP DRUNK” Petrol Sniffing Can be Beaten. Oct 16
Down Load:http://www.whywarriors.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Cheap-Drunk-170428-Final.docx Note: The following is not intended to be an in-depth study of petrol sniffing or the anti–sniffing programs run across the region. Having been centrally involved in permanently stopping petrol sniffing at Ramingining in the early 1980’s I…
Breaking of a People
Breaking of a People   Down Load: http://www.whywarriors.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Breaking-of-a-People-161205-final.docx Submission to Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory I have called this submission “breaking of a people” because I want to talk about a number of…
“Wedge-tailed Eagle we are all dying!”
I was sitting in a hospital waiting room to see a specialist and there were a number of Yolŋu present, also waiting to see the same doctor. None of these men and women was over mid-30s. As we sat there…
Stuck in a Colonial Mind-Set
Our last newsletter titled “Two Way Abuse in Aboriginal Communities” received great feedback. Many thanked us for saying what should have been said a long time ago. Among these were people who had spent years working in Aboriginal communities and…
Why the Government Can’t Succeed, But You Can!
Personnel in communities who put people centered processes before policy, bureaucratic expectations, and achievement, have better local engagement, and mobilise change in the long term. The flip side is, the impact of such people seems to fade before the devastation created by "the system".
My body is owned by this land
Jessie Pangas, a member of the AHED Project team, explores the concept of “home” in an interview with two Yolngu couples in Galiwin’ku. How many homes have you lived in? For me the answer is 21 and now I am…
What Happened to the Second Bark Petition?
                  This week is NAIDOC Week and this year’s theme is focused on the 50th anniversary of the presentation of the Yirrkala Bark Petition. It is a good time to remember the…
Economics of Remote Communities Part 6 – Recognising Pioneers and the Need for Flexibility
Based on our nine years of work in business development with Indigenous families, I think there are 5 main points that define the process of rebuilding sustainable economies in remote Indigenous communities. A local economy grows from personal motivation and…
Responding to Violence in the NT: the usual ‘get tough approach’, or a different way forward?
Richard Trudgen, author of Why Warriors Lie Down and Die, responds to media coverage of recent violence in NT communities: Richard Trudgen, author of Why Warriors Lie Down and Die, responds to the ABC news on the recent violence and…
On being income managed
As the mother of a two and a half year old, on a low income with my partner, I am eligible to receive a Parenting Payment from Centrelink, our Australian Department of Human Services.  As a family we highly value…
Economics of Remote Aboriginal Communities Part 2 – Today’s Economy.
In the previous article I discussed some of the historical influences on the economy in the remote Indigenous communities of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory.  Briefly, it shows that Indigenous people have been moved from a position of traditional…
Living Dead: A Yolngu Experience of Disempowerment
  This is a short video that describes living as a Yolngu person in a remote community in Australia. It is a story that the rest of us rarely hear expressed so clearly. Dianne, the speaker in this video has…